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Projects / Programmes source: ARIS

Vpliv hiperkapnične vadbe na intrakranialni tlak in oko

Research activity

Code Science Field Subfield
3.06.00  Medical sciences  Cardiovascular system   

Code Science Field
B620  Biomedical sciences  Ophtalmology 

Code Science Field
3.02  Medical and Health Sciences  Clinical medicine 
Keywords
Space life sciences, Microgravity ocular syndrome, vision impairment, intracranial pressure
Evaluation (rules)
source: COBISS
Researchers (7)
no. Code Name and surname Research area Role Period No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  11537  PhD Polonca Jaki Mekjavič  Medical sciences  Researcher  2019 - 2022  380 
2.  21074  Barbara Klemenc    Technical associate  2020 - 2022  14 
3.  29596  PhD Eva Lenassi  Medical sciences  Researcher  2019  60 
4.  33333  PhD Adam Charles McDonnell  Neurobiology  Researcher  2019 - 2022  140 
5.  14676  PhD Igor Mekjavić  Cardiovascular system  Head  2019 - 2022  1,274 
6.  52496  Joshua Royal  Public health (occupational safety)  Researcher  2019 - 2022 
7.  56052  Riccardo Sorrentino  Neurobiology  Researcher  2022 
Organisations (2)
no. Code Research organisation City Registration number No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  0106  Jožef Stefan Institute  Ljubljana  5051606000  90,976 
2.  0312  University Medical Centre Ljubljana  Ljubljana  5057272000  77,744 
Abstract
A major hindrance to future long-term missions on the International Space Station, and to the exploration of the Moon and Mars are the unexplained ophthalmic changes observed in a subset of astronauts. A series of investigations are proposed to assess the effect of 6° head down tilt (establishing the cephalad displacement noted in astronauts in microgravity)during rest and exercise (simulating the exercise performed by astronauts to mitigate the sarcopenia induced by unloading of the weightbearing limbs) in a normocapnic and hypercapnic (simulating the conditions on the International Space Station)conditions.  Previous studies have demonstrated that changing body position to a head-down orientation elevates intracranial pressure, and that most likely autoregulatory vascular mechanisms return intracranial pressure towards normal levels. The effect of a hypercapnic environment, as exists on the ISS, on these mechanisms is unknown. Furthermore, regular resistive and aerobic exercise is performed by astronauts on the ISS as a countermeasure to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning due to relative inactivity, and musculoskeletal atrophy as a consequence of  the unloading of the weight bearing limbs in microgravity. Under the hypercapnic microgravity conditions within the ISS, exercise may create large transient elevations in intracranial pressure, which may have cumulative long lasting effects. The present study will simulate the cephalad displacement of body fluids experienced by astronauts in microgravity with the 6° head-down tilt experimental model. While maintaining this body position, subjects will be conduct exercise breathing either a normocapnic or hypocapnic mormoxic gas mixture, thus simulating the environment within space habitats. The results of the proposed study will elucidate the role of hypercapnic exercise on the aetiology of the space ocular syndrome. This will contribute to the development of appropriate countermeasures to prevent this syndrome during long duration missions. The results will also have important terrestrial applications.Ocular health provides insight into structural changes that can occur in the eyes and nervous system, which could be relevant for patients suffering from a wide range of ocular diseases, such as glaucoma and different diseases due to vascular impairment of choroid and retina. It also provides data that could be used to help patients suffering from brain diseases, such as hydrocephalus and high blood pressure in the brain.
Significance for science
Scientific novelty. Previous studies have demonstrated that changing body position to a head-down orientation elevates intracranial pressure, and that most likely autoregulatory vascular mechanisms return intracranial pressure towards normal levels. The effect of a hypercapnic environment, as exists on the ISS, on these mechanisms is unknown. Furthermore, regular resistive and aerobic exercise is performed by astronauts on the ISS as a countermeasure to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning due to relative inactivity, and musculoskeletal atrophy as a consequence of  the unloading of the weight bearing limbs in microgravity. Under the hypercapnic microgravity conditions within the ISS, exercise may create large transient elevations in intracranial pressure, which may have cumulative long lasting effects. The present study will simulate the cephalad displacement of body fluids experienced by astronauts in microgravity with the 6° head-down tilt experimental model. While maintaining this body position, subjects will be conduct exercise breathing either a normocapnic or hypocapnic mormoxic gas mixture, thus simulating the environment within space habitats. Applied value. The results of the proposed study will elucidate the role of hypercapnic exercise on the aetiology of the space ocular syndrome. This will contribute to the development of appropriate countermeasures to prevent this syndrome during long duration space missions. The results will also have important terrestrial applications.Ocular health provides insight into structural changes that can occur in the eyes and nervous system, which could be relevant for patients suffering from a wide range of ocular diseases, such as glaucoma and different diseases due to vascular impairment of choroid and retina. It also provides data that could be used to help patients suffering from brain diseases, such as hydrocephalus and high blood pressure in the brain.
Significance for the country
Scientific novelty. Previous studies have demonstrated that changing body position to a head-down orientation elevates intracranial pressure, and that most likely autoregulatory vascular mechanisms return intracranial pressure towards normal levels. The effect of a hypercapnic environment, as exists on the ISS, on these mechanisms is unknown. Furthermore, regular resistive and aerobic exercise is performed by astronauts on the ISS as a countermeasure to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning due to relative inactivity, and musculoskeletal atrophy as a consequence of  the unloading of the weight bearing limbs in microgravity. Under the hypercapnic microgravity conditions within the ISS, exercise may create large transient elevations in intracranial pressure, which may have cumulative long lasting effects. The present study will simulate the cephalad displacement of body fluids experienced by astronauts in microgravity with the 6° head-down tilt experimental model. While maintaining this body position, subjects will be conduct exercise breathing either a normocapnic or hypocapnic mormoxic gas mixture, thus simulating the environment within space habitats. Applied value. The results of the proposed study will elucidate the role of hypercapnic exercise on the aetiology of the space ocular syndrome. This will contribute to the development of appropriate countermeasures to prevent this syndrome during long duration space missions. The results will also have important terrestrial applications.Ocular health provides insight into structural changes that can occur in the eyes and nervous system, which could be relevant for patients suffering from a wide range of ocular diseases, such as glaucoma and different diseases due to vascular impairment of choroid and retina. It also provides data that could be used to help patients suffering from brain diseases, such as hydrocephalus and high blood pressure in the brain.
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