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Projects / Programmes source: ARIS

A strategy to improve the quality of life and orthopaedic treatment of cartilage lesions – Advanced 3D (bio)printed scaffolds for tissue regeneration

Research activity

Code Science Field Subfield
3.08.00  Medical sciences  Public health (occupational safety)   

Code Science Field
3.03  Medical and Health Sciences  Health sciences 
Keywords
Tissue engineering, 3D (bio)printed cellular scaffolds, human articular chondrocytes, phenotype preservation, gene expression
Evaluation (rules)
source: COBISS
Points
12,716.31
A''
2,578.81
A'
7,264.36
A1/2
9,761.33
CI10
11,690
CImax
1,076
h10
46
A1
38.63
A3
13.48
Data for the last 5 years (citations for the last 10 years) on July 17, 2024; A3 for period 2018-2022
Data for ARIS tenders ( 04.04.2019 – Programme tender, archive )
Database Linked records Citations Pure citations Average pure citations
WoS  612  12,114  10,076  16.46 
Scopus  596  14,148  11,973  20.09 
Researchers (24)
no. Code Name and surname Research area Role Period No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  29730  Urška Antonič    Technical associate  2020 - 2024 
2.  51167  Doris Bračič  Textile and leather  Researcher  2020 - 2023  25 
3.  37632  PhD Matej Bračič  Chemistry  Researcher  2020 - 2024  153 
4.  54490  Laura Činč Ćurić  Pharmacy  Researcher  2021 - 2024  19 
5.  28477  PhD Matjaž Finšgar  Chemistry  Researcher  2020 - 2024  417 
6.  19753  PhD Lidija Fras Zemljič  Textile and leather  Researcher  2020 - 2024  547 
7.  32509  Kristina Gornik Kramberger  Oncology  Researcher  2020 - 2024  42 
8.  20420  PhD Lidija Gradišnik  Neurobiology  Researcher  2020 - 2024  294 
9.  52365  Nina Greiner  Medical sciences  Researcher  2020 
10.  32494  PhD Miloš Kalc  Sport  Researcher  2020 - 2024  42 
11.  13343  PhD Nadja Kokalj Vokač  Oncology  Researcher  2020 - 2024  450 
12.  15712  Martina Kos  Public health (occupational safety)  Technical associate  2020 - 2024  40 
13.  52549  Sandra Martič  Public health (occupational safety)  Technical associate  2020 - 2024 
14.  35511  PhD Tinkara Mastnak  Chemistry  Researcher  2020 - 2022  19 
15.  33260  PhD Tina Maver  Medical sciences  Researcher  2021 - 2024  181 
16.  30850  PhD Uroš Maver  Medical sciences  Researcher  2020 - 2024  456 
17.  50675  PhD Marko Milojević  Metabolic and hormonal disorders  Junior researcher  2020 - 2021  60 
18.  33768  PhD Tamilselvan Mohan  Textile and leather  Researcher  2020 - 2024  211 
19.  37998  PhD Jakob Naranđa  Medical sciences  Researcher  2020 - 2024  61 
20.  34307  MSc Lidija Škodič  Chemistry  Researcher  2021 - 2023  18 
21.  53295  Tadej Tofant    Technical associate  2020 - 2024  13 
22.  30458  PhD Matjaž Vogrin  Medical sciences  Head  2020 - 2024  316 
23.  35474  PhD Tanja Vrabelj  Chemistry  Researcher  2023 - 2024  59 
24.  18205  PhD Boris Zagradišnik  Oncology  Researcher  2020 - 2024  259 
Organisations (4)
no. Code Research organisation City Registration number No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  0334  University Medical Centre Maribor  Maribor  5054150000  23,101 
2.  0794  University of Maribor, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering  Maribor  5089638012  13,182 
3.  0795  University ob Maribor, Faculty of mechanical engineering  Maribor  5089638010  24,090 
4.  2334  University of Maribor, Faculty of Medicine  Maribor  5089638048  15,950 
Abstract
Lesions of the articular cartilage represents a major challenge for orthopaedic surgeons due to its limited intrinsic healing potential. Current treatment options used in orthopaedic practice to repair cartilage give unpredictable and often unsatisfactory results. At the site of injury, inferior fibrous tissue is formed with inferior biochemical and biomechanical properties compared to healthy cartilage tissue. The field of regenerative medicine and cartilage tissue engineering has evoked intense interest since it provides an alternative strategy to restore cartilage tissue and promises to improve clinical outcome. The state-of-the-art concept of cartilage tissue development combines the use of biocompatible and biodegradable carrier materials (scaffolds), the application of growth factors, the use of different cell types and mechanical stimulation. The important aspect of scaffolds formation represents appropriate 3-D matrices that act as an initial support for the desired cells to attach, proliferate and form their native extracellular matrix. The microstructure of the scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering (e.g. pore shape, size, porosity and interconnectivity) can directly affect the behavior of the seeded cells and is usually associated with the mechanical properties. Therefore, a variety of materials and techniques were utilized to control the mentioned scaffold characteristics. An interesting approach to scaffold formation represents 3D (bio)printing method which yields biocompatible and biomechanically stable scaffold with controllable pore dimensions in various shapes. Manipulation of 3D bioprinting parameters and their optimization as well as proper material selection enables production of a scaffold with desirable architecture characteristics. Moreover, 3D (bio)printing of polysaccharide-based (bio)inks and blends of polysacharides in combination with synthetic materials provide new insights in hybrid (bio)ink processability. Within the framework of this project, we will harvest, isolate and characterize human articular chondrocyte obtained from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty, produce suitable scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering with abovementioned method and create cartilage tissue constructs that will be incubated under mechanical stimulation (bioreactors). As prepared cartilage tissue constructs will be characterized using various analyzing methods: e.g. Live/Dead assay, confocal microscopy and histological analysis to evaluate the cell viability and the depth of cell ingrowth, immunohistochemistry and cartilage specific gene expression (Collagen type 2, Aggrecan, etc.) in order to evaluate the cartilage phenotype preservation. Additionally, mechanical properties and the degradation rates will be determined. In this manner we will develop new methods for effective cartilage regeneration, which will potentially translate into clinical practice in the future. By successfully treating cartilage injuries, we can expect reduced osteoarthritis morbidity and consequently improved quality of life of orthopedic patients with cartilage pathology.
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