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Projects / Programmes source: ARIS

Computational Modelling of Fracture in Brittle, Quasi-Brittle and Ductile Structures

Research activity

Code Science Field Subfield
2.01.03  Engineering sciences and technologies  Civil engineering  Constructions in civil engineering 

Code Science Field
P170  Natural sciences and mathematics  Computer science, numerical analysis, systems, control 

Code Science Field
2.01  Engineering and Technology  Civil engineering 
Keywords
Structures, brittle and ductile materials, fracture, cracks, softening, phase field, embedded discontinuity, mixed elements
Evaluation (rules)
source: COBISS
Researchers (11)
no. Code Name and surname Research area Role Period No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  10562  PhD Boštjan Brank  Civil engineering  Head  2019 - 2022  465 
2.  54198  PhD Nima Dadashzadeh  Civil engineering  Researcher  2020 - 2021  13 
3.  28903  Simon Detellbach    Technical associate  2021 - 2022  191 
4.  26550  PhD Jaka Dujc  Civil engineering  Researcher  2019 - 2022  50 
5.  11536  PhD Jože Korelc  Civil engineering  Researcher  2019 - 2022  363 
6.  54966  Nina Kumer  Civil engineering  Technical associate  2020 - 2021 
7.  53352  PhD Blaž Kurent  Civil engineering  Junior researcher  2020 - 2022  26 
8.  39204  PhD Marko Lavrenčič  Civil engineering  Researcher  2020 - 2022  34 
9.  19728  PhD Vlado Stankovski  Computer science and informatics  Researcher  2019  296 
10.  54082  Luka Trček  Traffic systems  Researcher  2021 - 2022  26 
11.  56372  PhD Tomo Veldin  Mechanics  Researcher  2022 
Organisations (1)
no. Code Research organisation City Registration number No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  0792  University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering  Ljubljana  1626981  25,755 
Abstract
The project proposes research on computational models for fracture in structures. The computational models for fracture are the core of structural failure analysis. The latter is the key tool to improve the processes of design, manufacturing, operation and maintenance, and to estimate safety of structures, industrial and energy plants and equipment. The basic idea of the project is to develop computational models for fracture for several important engineering applications. To this end, two particular methods, namely, the phase field method, and the embedded-strong-discontinuity finite element method, will be studied, further developed and tailored for the task. The hypothesis is, that these two methods are particularly well suited for modelling fracture in geometrically complex shell-like structures, brittle, quasi-brittle and ductile solids, and reinforced concrete plates (i.e. flat shells). The computational methods for fracture will be coupled with advanced, mixed finite element formulations for shells and solids, and with inelastic material models, such as damage, plasticity, and mixed-mode softening cohesive laws. The result of the project will be novel, advanced, mixed finite element formulations for modelling fracture in structures, and the corresponding computer codes. The latter will be verified and validated. The novel computational tools will have a large potential to be applied for numerous engineering problems. An example is failure analysis of reinforced concrete bridges, including the evaluation of limit load, safety and residual capacity of existing bridges. Another important example is performance of virtual experiments up to complete failure of small and large specimens of various materials that behave like shells, solids or plates.
Significance for science
There are numerous applications in engineering and materials sciences, which call for computational tools for fracture analysis. Major applications are in designing new products and structures, and checking the safety and residual capacity of existing ones. The applications are also in designing new materials, in order to obtain the fundamental understanding of how new materials fail. The results of this research project will be the improved computational tools for fracture analysis of (i) brittle shells, (ii) brittle, quasi-brittle and ductile 2d solids, and (iii) reinforced concrete plates. The novel computational tools will have a potential to be employed, directly or with modifications/extensions, in numerous applications in engineering. Let us mention some. (a) Failure analysis of masonry walls. (b) Failure analysis of reinforced concrete bridges, including the evaluation of limit load, safety and residual capacity of existing bridges. (c) Performance of virtual experiments, as an addition to real laboratory experiments, up to complete failure of specimens of various materials that behave like shells, 2d solids or plates. The results of the project will be relevant for further research in the area of computational methods for fracture. Such research will finally lead to reliable, efficient and robust, theoretically sound, and easy to use computational tools. The results of the project will be of practical use for the practitioners, i.e. designers of products, structures and materials.
Significance for the country
There are numerous applications in engineering and materials sciences, which call for computational tools for fracture analysis. Major applications are in designing new products and structures, and checking the safety and residual capacity of existing ones. The applications are also in designing new materials, in order to obtain the fundamental understanding of how new materials fail. The results of this research project will be the improved computational tools for fracture analysis of (i) brittle shells, (ii) brittle, quasi-brittle and ductile 2d solids, and (iii) reinforced concrete plates. The novel computational tools will have a potential to be employed, directly or with modifications/extensions, in numerous applications in engineering. Let us mention some. (a) Failure analysis of masonry walls. (b) Failure analysis of reinforced concrete bridges, including the evaluation of limit load, safety and residual capacity of existing bridges. (c) Performance of virtual experiments, as an addition to real laboratory experiments, up to complete failure of specimens of various materials that behave like shells, 2d solids or plates. The results of the project will be relevant for further research in the area of computational methods for fracture. Such research will finally lead to reliable, efficient and robust, theoretically sound, and easy to use computational tools. The results of the project will be of practical use for the practitioners, i.e. designers of products, structures and materials.
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