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Projects / Programmes source: ARIS

SLOfit lifelong

Research activity

Code Science Field Subfield
5.10.01  Social sciences  Sport  Kinesiology - pedagogical aspect (sport, training, motorial learning) 

Code Science Field
S273  Social sciences  Physical training, motorial learning, sport 

Code Science Field
3.03  Medical and Health Sciences  Health sciences 
Keywords
physical fitness, health outcome, prospective cohort study, epidemiology, physical activity, health risk factor
Evaluation (rules)
source: COBISS
Researchers (13)
no. Code Name and surname Research area Role Period No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  51993  PhD Saša Đurić  Educational studies  Researcher  2019 - 2021  78 
2.  21541  PhD Petra Golja  Cardiovascular system  Researcher  2019 - 2022  311 
3.  20405  PhD Gregor Jurak  Educational studies  Head  2019 - 2022  1,123 
4.  55256  Urška Kereži    Technical associate  2021  632 
5.  18704  PhD Marjeta Kovač  Educational studies  Researcher  2019 - 2022  1,507 
6.  53765  Jaka Kramaršič    Technical associate  2021  10 
7.  04957  PhD Bojan Leskošek  Sport  Researcher  2019 - 2022  442 
8.  33881  PhD Shawnda Morrison  Cardiovascular system  Researcher  2020 - 2022  192 
9.  56020  PhD Jerneja Premelč  Sport  Researcher  2021 - 2022  39 
10.  50017  PhD Vedrana Sember  Educational studies  Researcher  2019 - 2022  176 
11.  50428  PhD Maroje Sorić  Sport  Researcher  2019 - 2022  149 
12.  22384  PhD Gregor Starc  Sport  Researcher  2019 - 2022  772 
13.  04959  PhD Vojko Strojnik  Educational studies  Researcher  2019 - 2022  587 
Organisations (1)
no. Code Research organisation City Registration number No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  0587  University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Sport  Ljubljana  1627040  20,161 
Abstract
The main goal of SLOfit lifelong is to create and test the infrastructure for the exploration of the causal association between physical fitness in children and adolescents and future health outcomes based on lifelong surveillance of physical fitness and several physical activity-related health risk factors. Understanding whether low/high physical fitness in young people is a predictor of future disease/better health status would help in resolving the debate on the benefits of preventive physical fitness activities in childhood. Consequently, proper measures would decrease public health burden of physical inactivity-related diseases. Currently, due to a limited number of prospective studies, there is inconclusive evidence for predictive validity of certain components of physical fitness on future health outcomes. In Slovenia, we have an exceptional opportunity to establish such a research infrastructure. Namely, physical fitness of children and adolescents during the whole schooling period has been monitored since 1982 by national surveillance system called SLOfit. Hence, University of Ljubljana holds data on more than 40 cohorts followed for 13 years (age 6-19). However, individuals within these cohorts were anonymised due to legislation; therefore, tracking these individuals later in life is not possible. On the other side, we have recently developed the application My SLOfit. Among other features, this application allows users to store collected physical fitness data. In that way, we have developed an opportunity for lifelong data collection of physical fitness and some related data. This could enable examining the causal association between physical fitness in children and adolescents and future health outcomes. To design and test such a research infrastructure, we propose to: a) develop  physical fitness test batteries for adults and elderly which will be comparable to the tests used in the school period, and logistically feasible/rational; b) develop a tool for health risk assessment in adults and elderly based on the values of different physical fitness components; c) develop the SLOfit lifelong module within the SLOfit web platform which will enable lifelong storing of physical fitness results and other SLOfit data; d) examine the causal relationship between physical fitness in childhood and obesity in adulthood. The proposed project would create a unique research platform for studying predictive validity of health-related fitness in youth. Every year a new cohort would enter the physical fitness surveillance system, which would enable a continuous flow of new data. The study of the correlation between physical fitness, health outcomes and physical activity related health risk factors would allow us to use an epigenetic approach in examining the relationship between physical fitness and health outcomes. This would launch University of Ljubljana among top research organisations in the area of physical activity epidemiology. Our study will exceed other cohort studies in terms of the number of participants in each cohort, the number of cohorts and the frequency of follow-ups. Additional strength of our cohort study will be also that it will contain data on physical and motor development in childhood, which is very important for physical activity interventions, as these have proven to be the most effective and most feasible when nested within the school setting. The SLOfit lifelong cohort study will be also one of the few studies that will contain various components of a physical fitness (i.e. coordination, flexibility), which will allow almost unique investigation of predictive validity of these components on health outcomes later in life. With excellent data pooling options the SLOfit platform will be one of the most cost-effective and for lay public, one of the most user-friendly scientific infrastructures (giving feedback with tips for individual users and forecasts of future trends).
Significance for science
In scientific terms, the SLOfit already presents an excellent research platform (just data for schoolchildren) with a database, which grows at a rate of over 220.000 new sets of measurements every year. By extending SLOfit to adult life, we would create a database of life-long surveillance of physical fitness and related health outcome, unique by both its size and the time span it would cover. Every year a new cohort would enter the physical fitness surveillance system. Additionally, in the next decades, the developed system would allow us to link physical fitness with data on health and investigate the relationship of physical fitness and health outcomes in both individuals and clusters (i.e. families, peers etc.). In cooperation with scientists from other disciplines, this would enable us to use an epigenetic approach in examining the relationship between physical fitness and health outcomes. Such research infrastructure would launch University of Ljubljana among top research organisations in the area of physical activity epidemiology. Namely, our study will exceed other cohort studies in terms of the number of participants in each cohort, the number of cohorts and the frequency of measurement. There are, however, large cohort studies in adults (e.g. ACLS, Harvard alumni, Nurses health study), but none of them have data on physical fitness in childhood, which are very important for physical activity interventions, as these have proven to be the most effective and most feasible when nested within the school setting. SLOfit Lifelong Study will be also one of the few studies that will contain various components of a physical fitness (i.e. coordination, flexibility), which will allow almost unique investigation of predictive validity of these components on health outcomes later in life. All mentioned will enable cooperation with other researcher groups, for example in forming cohort consortiums such as i3C (International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort Consortium). Furthermore, this will help us with attracting talented young scientists and creating a research group of global relevance. Finally, by creating a sustainable infrastructure and funding of investigators working on it we will be in a position to conduct outstanding research and publish findings in eminent scientific journals for the next couple of decades, similar like other comparable cohort studies. With the introduction and development of SLOfit Lifelong research infrastructure, our research platform is going to expand and gain unprecedented possibilities of direct life-long communication with individual users. This means that an individual profile will have the possibility to be supplemented also by additional data on physical fitness and physical activity later in life, morbidity, socio-economic status, according to users’ preferences. In addition, profiles of individual users could be linked with other users to, for example, create family profiles of physical and motor development.
Significance for the country
In scientific terms, the SLOfit already presents an excellent research platform (just data for schoolchildren) with a database, which grows at a rate of over 220.000 new sets of measurements every year. By extending SLOfit to adult life, we would create a database of life-long surveillance of physical fitness and related health outcome, unique by both its size and the time span it would cover. Every year a new cohort would enter the physical fitness surveillance system. Additionally, in the next decades, the developed system would allow us to link physical fitness with data on health and investigate the relationship of physical fitness and health outcomes in both individuals and clusters (i.e. families, peers etc.). In cooperation with scientists from other disciplines, this would enable us to use an epigenetic approach in examining the relationship between physical fitness and health outcomes. Such research infrastructure would launch University of Ljubljana among top research organisations in the area of physical activity epidemiology. Namely, our study will exceed other cohort studies in terms of the number of participants in each cohort, the number of cohorts and the frequency of measurement. There are, however, large cohort studies in adults (e.g. ACLS, Harvard alumni, Nurses health study), but none of them have data on physical fitness in childhood, which are very important for physical activity interventions, as these have proven to be the most effective and most feasible when nested within the school setting. SLOfit Lifelong Study will be also one of the few studies that will contain various components of a physical fitness (i.e. coordination, flexibility), which will allow almost unique investigation of predictive validity of these components on health outcomes later in life. All mentioned will enable cooperation with other researcher groups, for example in forming cohort consortiums such as i3C (International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort Consortium). Furthermore, this will help us with attracting talented young scientists and creating a research group of global relevance. Finally, by creating a sustainable infrastructure and funding of investigators working on it we will be in a position to conduct outstanding research and publish findings in eminent scientific journals for the next couple of decades, similar like other comparable cohort studies. With the introduction and development of SLOfit Lifelong research infrastructure, our research platform is going to expand and gain unprecedented possibilities of direct life-long communication with individual users. This means that an individual profile will have the possibility to be supplemented also by additional data on physical fitness and physical activity later in life, morbidity, socio-economic status, according to users’ preferences. In addition, profiles of individual users could be linked with other users to, for example, create family profiles of physical and motor development.
Most important scientific results
Most important socioeconomically and culturally relevant results Interim report
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