Loading...
Projects / Programmes source: ARIS

Compton Camera with Position Sensitive Silicon Detectors

Research activity

Code Science Field Subfield
1.02.01  Natural sciences and mathematics  Physics  Physics of condesed matter 

Code Science Field
P210  Natural sciences and mathematics  Elementary particle physics, quantum field theory 
P265  Natural sciences and mathematics  Semiconductory physics 
Keywords
silicon detectors, strip detectors, pixel detectors, Compton camera, SPECT, PET
Evaluation (rules)
source: COBISS
Researchers (6)
no. Code Name and surname Research area Role Period No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  09081  PhD Vladimir Cindro  Physics  Researcher  2002 - 2004  1,569 
2.  15642  PhD Gregor Kramberger  Physics  Researcher  2002 - 2004  1,470 
3.  04763  PhD Marko Mikuž  Physics  Researcher  2002 - 2004  1,615 
4.  21552  PhD Andrej Studen  Physics  Researcher  2002 - 2004  129 
5.  14570  PhD Damijan Škrk  Physics  Researcher  2002 - 2003  159 
6.  12750  PhD Dejan Žontar  Physics  Head  2002 - 2004  350 
Organisations (1)
no. Code Research organisation City Registration number No. of publicationsNo. of publications
1.  0106  Jožef Stefan Institute  Ljubljana  5051606000  90,038 
Abstract
The project is devoted to basic research into application of position sensitive silicon detectors as first detectors of a Compton camera, a novel device to be used for imaging in SPECT or PET. This approach should offer improved sensitivity as compared to standard techniquies as Anger cameras or scintillator based PET apparata. Modest resolution 1.4x1.4 mm2 pad detectors are proposed as SPECT detectors. Smaller pad sizes of 0.4x0.4 mm2 or alternatively a double sided strip detector are considered to achieve spatial resolution in PET imaging three times better than current state of the art. The required substrate thickness of up to 1.5 mm, the ultra-low noise levels demanded and severe timing constraints, together with set-up optimization and prototype construction call for an extenstion of knowledge in operation of slilicon detectors.
Views history
Favourite